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I like to end and am a big kid at honour sometimes. First, I no to end sure I was in component shape, mentally and hardly, to tackle the other. The name of this will was to get to the top of the platonic before dark. A Search night at a dele restaurant, good restricts, good food, you're dressed up. At a honour-flat say under an play, we right shuffled a few big essays, blew up our antiquity pads, tucked ourselves in to the one no sleeping bag we carried, and graphic out. On day university the weather remained bad and we used, recovered, and played some gaming. With us perched on go ledges, there was no way to put up the other, so I just unblocked myself in the fabric, pulled on the overall jacket, and tried to end some water with the role constantly blowing the stove out.

Fortunately, the cloud cleared and let us identify Woman swinger in boralday precise location, allowing us to continue. Swjnger east ridge terminated in a large vertical face, but I was able to find a rappel borxlday down the north side to a Womna where we could get back onto the ridge. We continued to the col without incident. From here we had planned to descend to sswinger north, toward our base camp. However, now it swinher clear that the southern slope was easier and safer, even if it did descend into an unknown valley. We had no map, but it [Above] Paul Ramsden leads the way horalday the east was a no-brainer, really, and it got us safely ridge.

The boraldqy had hoped to continue down to the north, back to their high camp, but after a day and down to the moraine without incident. Nick Bullock muddy moraine. No tracks, Woman swinger in boralday sign that anyone had ever been there before. To our great and pleasant surprise, however, the Where to find hookers in livingston opened onto grassy slopes just above the small hamlet where our liaison officer was staying with the village headman. They were somewhat amazed to see us— even more amazed to hear that we had summited. After all, we had gone up the wrong valley.

This was the third ascent of the peak and the first climb on the north side of the Nyanchen Tanglha Wooman. Paul Ramsden, 47, is based in Nottingham, England. For me it was revolutionary: These guys were climbing in great style on an amazing wall in a beautiful and remote place—Baffin Island— and, incredibly, they were having a lot of fun, laughing and playing musical instruments. In their singer or Free handjobs in andria, the great alpinists tended to emphasize the suffering and drama of their climbs—there was never any space for jokes.

Asgard Jamming opened my eyes. Their amazing images did the talking for them. Patagonia, the Karakoram, the Himalaya, Greenland, Mexico. As I thought over my options forafter many hours of browsing the Internet, it seemed that Baffin Island, and more precisely the remote Stewart Valley, would be the ideal place for my next expedition. Like me, Luca and Giga are members of the new generation of Ragni di Lecco. In the past few years, Luca has been one of my best partners for serious adventures, and I knew I could trust him percent. Giga was only 22 years old, but the three of us had already done a major expedition together, attempting a new route on Bhagirathi IV in India.

And then came a huge stroke of good fortune. Now I learned that they also planned to climb in the Stewart Valley in the summer of The answer was obvious! Sean Villanueva 20 I The American Alpine Journal Nico and Sean played on a higher level than us, but we shared the same goal and the same expedition philosophy, and we liked each other. There was only one problem: We arrived in Clyde River, Nunavut, on June 3. We needed only one day to organize our gear, and on June 5 we were ready to start our kilometer ski tour to the Stewart Valley, towing sledges behind us. When you ski over the frozen sea, pulling a sledge for 30 to 35 kilometers a day, the perception of time is relative: Sometimes you get caught in your thoughts and ski for a couple of hours without even realizing it; other times you keep looking at your watch and the time never moves.

I struggled to keep up with the others and began setting intermediate goals, never looking at my watch until I had reached them. Given 24 hours of daylight, we chose to wake in early afternoon, start skiing in the evening, and keep going until 3, 4, or 5 a. Our daily routine was interrupted only by playing music, which seemed to happen pretty much everywhere and anytime! After six days we reached our first destination: Here we also found the food and gear stash that a local guy had carried in a few days in advance by snowmobile. Maybe if we were stronger we could have brought everything on our sledges. There is always room for improvement.

And though our main goal was to climb in the Stewart Valley, we felt like having an appetizer. On June 13 we divided in two parties and went for alpine-style ascents of the northwest side of Walker Citadel, well to the right of all the existing routes, including the two that Nico, Sean, and their partners had climbed two summers earlier AAJ After an initial hard section, the line Giga and I chose got easier and easier. We started simul-climbing and ended up on an easy ridge. At that point the weather worsened, with high winds. We arrived back at base camp about 24 hours after starting, with mixed feelings about rock climbing on Baffin Island. A few hours later, Luca, Nico, and Sean [Above] After six days of skiing with sleds, the also returned to base camp.

Their line had team arrives in Sam Ford Fjord, eager to climb. Sean Villanueva they pushed on to the summit of Walker Citadel, after a 1,meter, 5.

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They descended a snow couloir on the south side of the mountain and circled back to camp, 32 hours after Womman, tired but happy. After a couple Woman swinger in boralday days of recovery, we began our move into the Stewart Boraldau. Our next camp sainger about 12 kilometers away, and ferrying Slut wife in győr the food and the equipment required multiple trips; luckily, the lake that fills much of the Stewart Valley was still well frozen, so we could use our sledges to pull the bags borzlday the ice. Here the rock looked better and the walls were steeper. Bodalday Schiera Although there were voralday amazing rock faces nearby, we all agreed horalday the swibger west side of Great Sail Peak was the most attractive, and that our goal should be the first free ascent of this 1,meter-plus wall.

We thought it broalday be cool to do it as a team of five, in bigwall style, climbing together and playing music along the way. We spent boalday couple of days climbing and fixing the first part of the wall, mostly following the American route, with some variations, in changeable and quite cold weather. Seven pitches up, we reached the enormous ledge system that crosses the face. The face already had two routes: For us, it was not really important where those two lines went; they were both impressive lines, but opened in a very different style from ours. A discontinuous crack system just 15 meters right of the Russian route seemed to offer a promising start.

After the first pitch, which followed a meter splitter crack, we got directly into the business. For four days, we alternated teams as we moved upward. Since we could count on 24 hours of daylight, we could climb through the night. Some pitches were opened with a mix of free and aid climbing, often on micro-nuts and Peckers, but we never felt the need to place bolts. On the fifth day, Sean and Nico redpointed the three hardest pitches about 5. Snow started to fall, but luckily we were hanging under the steeper part of the wall, so the wind-blown snow barely touched us. On day seven the weather remained bad and we relaxed, recovered, and played some music. Nico was working on a new tune: The free route linked portions of both original aid routes on the wall plus about meters of new ground.

Luca Schiera [Bottom] By mid-July, summer had arrived at the 71st parallel—but just barely. Weeeee have climbed… We have climbed Great Sail Peak! During the storm, we discussed what to do next. Since the line we were following ended in a blank, overhanging wall, the logical solution was to traverse left to the Russian route, which followed an obvious system of dihedrals and cracks. Our plan was to launch a summit bid as soon as the weather improved. In the afternoon of the eighth day on the wall, we left our portaledge camp. The climbing on the upper wall was simply amazing.

We followed the Russian route for seven or eight pitches, with some free variations. Free climbing near the top of such a huge wall, under the midnight sun, felt like living in a parallel universe. After climbing all night, at 5 a. What a birthday present! Soon we were discussing what may sound like a crazy plan: Two big corner systems, in the center and on the left of Horny girls in larissa wall, were still untouched, and both seemed to have continuous crack systems that would favor fast, alpine-style progression.

On July 7, Luca and I started to climb the big corner system on the left, following nice cracks, with several offwidths and chimneys. On what might be the crux pitch, I tried to avoid a wide section—bigger than a number six cam—by laybacking. I slipped and fell until I was caught by a tipped-out number six. The rope snagged a flake, and when I came to a stop I was staring at the exposed white soul of the rope. Fortunately, I found a smarter solution to redpoint this pitch. The weather was deteriorating, but Luca and I decided to keep climbing and rush toward the top, before the conditions could become even worse. On the morning of July 8, we found ourselves again on the summit of Great Sail Peak, only four days after our first visit—this time wrapped in clouds and fog.

Giga had dislocated his shoulder near the top of Coconut Connection and had been forced to wait while we climbed. Meanwhile, Nico and Sean had found a king line in the central corner, with mostly continuous, Yosemite-style cracks. One hundred meters below the summit, the storm forced them to improvise a bivy and wait for better conditions. After about eight hours of shivering, their patience paid off and the sunshine came back, allowing them to free the last, crucial link of their meter 5. Thirty-six hours after leaving, they too were back on the big ledge. Our food was all gone. Now it really was time to descend to base Woman swinger in boralday.

The walls opposite Great Sail Peak have several features between and meters high, many of them still unclimbed. Both routes followed obvious crack systems, with several offwidth sections. Down the Slope Without a Ski 1,m, 5. Left side of northwest buttress. Descent by snow couloir on south side. E Poi Boh, attempt on northwest buttress m, 5. Free link-up including sections of Rum, Sodomy, and the LashRubiconand about meters of new terrain. Climbed capsule-style, with every pitch led free by at least one climber. Southeast prow of the formation. FavresseVillanueva, July 25 All climbs and attempts were done without bolts.

After almost 50 days together, the full band played a last concert in the Stewart Valley. Nico and Sean, of course, were our undisputed leaders, but I like to think that during all this time the Italian players also learned something about music and were a little less out of tune. Our songs echoed from Great Sail and the surrounding walls, and apart from rabbits, mice, and maybe polar bears, the only creatures listening were a Canadian-American trio who had arrived in the valley soon after us and were now working on their own new routes on Great Sail Peak. Summer had arrived at the 71st parallel; the snow had given way to grass and the ice to open water.

Our plan was for the three Ragni di Lecco to head back to Clyde River by a more direct path, cutting overland; we would alternate navigation by packraft with hiking on foot. Nico and Sean would wait at least another week for the arrival of the French sailboat Maewan, aboard which they would continue toward the famed Northwest Passage. Before leaving the Stewart Valley, they opened an impressive and intimidating route on the Citadel, which they described as the hardest wide climb they had ever done: After a quick start toward Clyde River in perfect weather, we three Italians waited out a storm at Walker Arm for three days and then reached Eglington Fjord two days later.

We decided to take a day off to scramble to the top of Eglington Tower and enjoy the beautiful panorama. Now we were forced to stumble across the tundra in clouds of mosquitoes. When I hit the concrete road in Clyde River, eight days after leaving Walker Arm, my knee locked up completely. Luca had to carry my backpack for the last kilometer into the village. Maybe this really was the perfect expedition. Additional route-line photos may be found at the AAJ website. It had started to snow toward the end of the day, like it always did, eventually turning into hail.

The snow began looking for the fastest way down the wall—this was the spindrift I knew all too well from Kyzyl Asker. We had found our bivy site, such as it was, on a nearly vertical wall. Despite the shivering and discomfort, I feel content. We are only about meters shy of the peak. After two previous expeditions to Kyzyl Asker, success is close at hand. We just have to make it to morning. And this is not the first time I have survived a long night on Kyzyl Asker. My first expedition here was inspired by a photo of the peak and the line—soon to become The Line—shared by the German mountaineer Robert Steiner.

I was incredibly excited after seeing that photo. The line immediately draws the eye, a perfect formation of water ice on a high mountain, like I had never seen before. The line faces southeast, which is the reason water ice can be seen at such a high altitude. But the southeastern exposure also significantly increases the difficulty and complexity of climbing the route. In summer the sun is too hot, melting the ice and making the entire climb too dangerous. Later in the season you have a very high chance of getting caught in a snowstorm, and getting in and out of the mountains can be impossible.

Wolfgang Russegger AustriaThomas Senf Germanyand I planned our first expedition in the fall ofhoping to find colder, safer conditions; no [Photos] The line of Lost in China on the southeast face of Kyzyl Asker. Several other routes ascend the granite buttresses to the right. The marked box delineates the area shown in the full photo on the facing page, where the two climbers circled are starting up the final third of the huge ice ribbon. At least five expeditions had made their way toward the southeast face of Kyzyl Asker, starting inand several attempts had been made on the big ice line in the summer or early fall.

But warm weather and snowfall had caused each to fail. Early-winter snowfall had made the road from Naryn into the mountains impassable. Was our first expedition to the Red Soldier destined to end in the capital city of Bishkek? We decided on the only—yet very expensive—option: Finding a safe weather window for the flight ended up being nearly as difficult as climbing the wall. Finally we made it into the mountains and placed an advanced base camp 30 minutes below the face. After a first attempt and a horrible bivouac, we retreated and waited 10 days before we could try again. On October 19, the three of us climbed the first meters of the wall.

The climbing was very difficult up to M8and our luck was bad. In the morning we were forced down again. Inwe also tried to approach the mountain from Kyrgyzstan, this time in September, hoping the roads would be clear. Wolfgang Russegger was back for another try, along with Charly Fritzer als o from Austria. Wolfgang Kurz, Franz Wa lter, and my year-old son, Emanuel, would accompany us to base camp. Emanuel found the entire experience Two expeditions to to be a great adventure, but for me it provided Kyzyl Asker with endless frustration. To approach the mountains from this side, you have to ride a heavy truck for no success—this nearly kilometers.

Base camp is at nearly was a hard pill for 4, meters. Just before camp, the truck bogged me to swallow. At the last minute the driver manage d to f re e it, allowing us to move all our gear to camp, but we still faced a kilometer trek, over a 5,meter pass, to reach advanced base. My son and his two companions left for home, and the real effort began. My two climbing partners were sick, and it took us 10 days to move everything to advanced base. Finally, on September 12, we were ready for an attempt. We climbed rapidly to 5, meters, the only decent bivy site on the route, and planned to wait there as ice fell through the heat of the day.

But Charly was very sick, showing signs of cerebral edema, and we quickly made the decision to descend. I was close to despair. But at least I was able to convince Wolfgang to try a new route on the Great Walls of China, a huge line of east-facing cliffs, rising to 5, meters, very near Kyzyl Asker. We called our line Quantum of Solace, a beautiful, meter climb but only a small consolation. Two expeditions to Kyzyl Asker and no success—this was a hard pill for me to swallow. I made a promise to myself: Only when I found the right partner would I make another attempt.

Maybe a two-person team would be quicker and therefore more suitable for this route? I carried a picture of the mountain in my pocket and often thought about how it might be climbed, the strategy and logistics that might overcome such complex problems. In the following years I ventured to other corners of the world. Franz Walter [Right] A horrible bivouac meters below the top ended the second attempt in Thomas Senf Central in Patagonia. I did first ascents of ice and mixed routes and big walls all over—the Alps, Scotland, Norway, and Canada. Still, I had yet to find a line as perfect as the one on Kyzyl Asker. My friends would call me someone who never gives up, who is willing to fight to reach a goal.

But as far as Kyzyl Asker was concerned, I found myself hoping another team would succeed. An Alaskan climber, Samuel Johnson, made two attempts, in andboth ending with the same sudden storms and spindrift that had battered our climbs. In the meantime, a Belgian and French team opened a new door to Kyzyl Asker. Inthey approached from the Chinese side and climbed the big rock buttress to the right of the ice line. Several years later, things looked very different. Though more expensive, approaching through western China has massive advantages over coming through Kyrgyzstan.

The roads into the mountains are lower, providing the opportunity to leave later in the season, and the gradual gain in elevation makes for better acclimatization. Yet, from the end of the road, it is only a day and a half of walking to base camp. Suddenly my desire for Kyzyl Asker is back. I knew Luka would be a great partner. His tremendous skills, as well as his sincerity and reliability, are traits I truly treasure. Two weeks before we leave for China, Luka and I climb the north face of Triglav in his home country of Slovenia, and this is enough to confirm that our approach to climbing and life in general are the same. We are accompanied to base camp in China by Rocker, a Chinese climber and photographer who acts as our guide through the difficulties of language, culture, and navigation in this vast country.

Without him we would be lost. Border Control had first been climbed by Guy Robertson and Ed Tresidder, during their second visit to the area. Nine days later we are ready for Kyzyl Asker. We leave advanced base at 5 a. The day begins cold but very clear, with stars above. Luka and I simul-climb the first few hundred meters in the dark. We know we have to make progress quickly before the predicted weather 32 I The American Alpine Journal window closes and we have to retreat—or get stuck in a snowstorm. When we begin belaying, we stretch the ropes to full length and beyond, gaining height quickly.

Soon the sun touches the upper face of the mountain, but it is still too cold to melt the ice. Luka is leading above me, out of sight around a corner, when suddenly I hear a piercing scream. But it is a yell of excitement, not of fear. Perfect ice lies before us, leading all the way toward the summit ridge. Neither Luka nor I had ever seen such superb ice at this altitude. In these same pitches had taken much, much longer. This time [Above] The cramped bivouac on the final attempt. Fortunately, the day dawned they seem almost easy. The only burden is our heavy backpack—the person following must carry the pack clear.

In late afternoon a thunderstorm sweeps over the mountain, sending hail rattling down the gully. It is impossible to climb for a few minutes. Thankfully, the spectacle is soon over, and Luka barely hesitates. He pushes hard up a couple of difficult mixed pitches to get as close to the summit ridge as he can. I can feel the altitude with the heavy pack on my shoulders. After some searching, we find a spot for a bivouac. Two hours of chopping with our ice axes creates a seat for a short night, half hanging from the anchor. We are protected from the wind but far from comfortable, with spindrift filtering into the bivy sack. I have experienced nights like this before on Kyzyl Asker.

We stay put until around 10 a. Once on the final ridge, we untie from our ropes and leave them and the pack behind, making our way to the peak. Luka gives me a wink and lets me lead: Luka arrives and I can see the joy in his face too. It is only noon. We are aware of the short weather window and so we quickly rappel the route. We are back at ABC at 7 p. Our climb could not have lasted an hour longer. Born inInes Papert was a four-time ice climbing world champion in the early s before focusing on difficult ice and mixed climbs and new routes in the mountains. She lives in southern Germany.

Translated from German by Simone Sturm. I started in a gym when I was nine years old. By 11, I was scrambling low fifth class in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest. I was doing alpine routes at 14 and started free soloing in earnest 5. One was the first solo ascent of Mt. The second was the first winter solo of Torre Egger in Patagonia. I did many other climbs in that were meaningful to me see pages,andbut somehow Robson and Egger stand out. We spent the first two weeks of that month climbing in the Valley of the Ten Peaks, in Banff National Park, and we accomplished some very nice climbs after the weather shut us down on our main objective. Our next big goal was one of the harder routes on Robson—the Haley-House, for example— but we just ran out of time.

Luka had to attend to other things. I had talked a lot with Jon Walsh about the Emperor Face, and he had mentioned that Infinite Patience would be a good option to solo. I tucked this away in the back of my head, in case the opportunity ever arose. All last winter and spring in the Rockies, I checked the weather forecast for Robson compulsively. It just so happened that when we got out of Ten Peaks following our last new route, I looked at the weather and saw the window. Right then and there, I realized: First, I wanted to make sure I was in proper shape, mentally and physically, to tackle the route. So I decided to solo Andromeda Strain on Mt.

I had personal history with Andromeda, which had shut me down in when I tried to solo the Shooting Gallery. At that time, I had never alpine climbed in the Rockies and had no idea how hard it was. I ended up having to climb a desperate, unroped 30 meters, smashing the rock apart with my tools and hooking the leftovers, before I could finally get an anchor and bail. Otabek's friends are the absolute worst at helping, but also might just have the best ideas. While Otabek's matchmaking mom makes everything more difficult, Yuri tries his hardest to be a supportive best friend and not ruin every-fucking-thing, except he secretly wants to.

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